Wyomingirl

Wyomingirl

oupacademic:

Very Short Fact: on this day in 1945, the world’s first atomic bomb was detonated near Alamogordo, New Mexico.

The bomb released the explosive force of nearly 19,000 tons of TNT, and the New Mexico sky was suddenly brighter than many suns. Some observers suffered temporary blindness even though they looked at the brilliant light through smoked glass. 

[p. 19, Nuclear Weapons: A Very Short Introduction, by Joseph M. Siracusa]
Like the Very Short Introductions on Facebook for more from the series.

oupacademic:

Very Short Fact: on this day in 1945, the world’s first atomic bomb was detonated near Alamogordo, New Mexico.

The bomb released the explosive force of nearly 19,000 tons of TNT, and the New Mexico sky was suddenly brighter than many suns. Some observers suffered temporary blindness even though they looked at the brilliant light through smoked glass. 

[p. 19, Nuclear Weapons: A Very Short Introduction, by Joseph M. Siracusa]

Like the Very Short Introductions on Facebook for more from the series.

patagonia:

Curse of the Towers - Wind River Mountain Range, Wyoming

patagonia:

Curse of the Towers - Wind River Mountain Range, Wyoming

(via coffeeinthemountains)

jtotheizzoe:

via watershedplus:

Yellowstone’s Grand Prismatic is named for its brilliant colouration. The colour spectrum that ranges from deep blue to burnt red is the product of trillions of thermophiles, or bacterial microorganisms, which flourish in hot waters. Different temperatures determine the hue, and the centre’s blue is the result of extreme heat (70 °C or 160 °F) that leaves the bacteria sterile.  Picture by Werner Van Steen/Getty

Extremophiles are proof of the power of evolution. On Earth, it seems like wherever life could remotely, possibly exist, it does.
And only by studying them, whether they grow in beautiful ponds like this or in the dark, ugly mud at the bottom of ocean vents, we can understand the limits and possibilities of biology.
As Dr. Ian Malcolm reminds us:
jtotheizzoe:

via watershedplus:

Yellowstone’s Grand Prismatic is named for its brilliant colouration. The colour spectrum that ranges from deep blue to burnt red is the product of trillions of thermophiles, or bacterial microorganisms, which flourish in hot waters. Different temperatures determine the hue, and the centre’s blue is the result of extreme heat (70 °C or 160 °F) that leaves the bacteria sterile.  Picture by Werner Van Steen/Getty

Extremophiles are proof of the power of evolution. On Earth, it seems like wherever life could remotely, possibly exist, it does.
And only by studying them, whether they grow in beautiful ponds like this or in the dark, ugly mud at the bottom of ocean vents, we can understand the limits and possibilities of biology.
As Dr. Ian Malcolm reminds us:

jtotheizzoe:

via watershedplus:

Yellowstone’s Grand Prismatic is named for its brilliant colouration. The colour spectrum that ranges from deep blue to burnt red is the product of trillions of thermophiles, or bacterial microorganisms, which flourish in hot waters. Different temperatures determine the hue, and the centre’s blue is the result of extreme heat (70 °C or 160 °F) that leaves the bacteria sterile.
Picture by Werner Van Steen/Getty

Extremophiles are proof of the power of evolution. On Earth, it seems like wherever life could remotely, possibly exist, it does.

And only by studying them, whether they grow in beautiful ponds like this or in the dark, ugly mud at the bottom of ocean vents, we can understand the limits and possibilities of biology.

As Dr. Ian Malcolm reminds us:

(via fastcompany)

newyorker:

The photographer Naomi Harris brought her shih tzu Maggie along on a road trip across the United States. She documented her travels in a visual diary on Instagram and hopes to compile her portraits into a book called “Dog Bless America”: http://nyr.kr/1pyOwPtTop: “Close encounters of the Maggie kind (this is where Close Encounters was filmed),” Naomi Harris writes in her Instagram feed. Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming. August 6, 2013.Bottom: “Maggie and George Washington, the meeting of great minds.” Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. September 22, 2013.All photographs by Naomi Harris.

Sigh.
newyorker:

The photographer Naomi Harris brought her shih tzu Maggie along on a road trip across the United States. She documented her travels in a visual diary on Instagram and hopes to compile her portraits into a book called “Dog Bless America”: http://nyr.kr/1pyOwPtTop: “Close encounters of the Maggie kind (this is where Close Encounters was filmed),” Naomi Harris writes in her Instagram feed. Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming. August 6, 2013.Bottom: “Maggie and George Washington, the meeting of great minds.” Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. September 22, 2013.All photographs by Naomi Harris.

Sigh.

newyorker:

The photographer Naomi Harris brought her shih tzu Maggie along on a road trip across the United States. She documented her travels in a visual diary on Instagram and hopes to compile her portraits into a book called “Dog Bless America”: http://nyr.kr/1pyOwPt

Top: “Close encounters of the Maggie kind (this is where Close Encounters was filmed),” Naomi Harris writes in her Instagram feed. Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming. August 6, 2013.
Bottom: “Maggie and George Washington, the meeting of great minds.” Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. September 22, 2013.
All photographs by Naomi Harris.

Sigh.

Going to the mountains is going home.

bijan:

Sundress — Ben Kweller

unplugged and awesome

As a kid my pops would take me to paleontology lectures at the Knight Geology building at the University of Wyoming. Some of the visiting speakers would hand draw scenes from different prehistoric periods.
This gifs remind me of those drawings in digital. Love it. 
amnhnyc:

Meet Dimorphodon, the toothy pterosaur.
Discovered in the 1820s on the coast of southern England, by a young woman, Mary Anning, famed for her fossil-finding abilities, Dimorphodon earned its names for its distinctive dentition. Dimorphodon, the genus name, means “two-formed tooth” and refers to the animal’s two types of teeth: Long, curved fangs that jut from the front of the jaws, and a row of short pointed teeth that lies behind.
Learn more about this pterosaur.

As a kid my pops would take me to paleontology lectures at the Knight Geology building at the University of Wyoming. Some of the visiting speakers would hand draw scenes from different prehistoric periods.

This gifs remind me of those drawings in digital. Love it. 

amnhnyc:

Meet Dimorphodon, the toothy pterosaur.

Discovered in the 1820s on the coast of southern England, by a young woman, Mary Anning, famed for her fossil-finding abilities, Dimorphodon earned its names for its distinctive dentition. Dimorphodon, the genus name, means “two-formed tooth” and refers to the animal’s two types of teeth: Long, curved fangs that jut from the front of the jaws, and a row of short pointed teeth that lies behind.

Learn more about this pterosaur.

explore-blog:

Lisa Congdon hand-letters some of history’s most timeless wisdom on how to live.

I don’t love all these songs but it is really fun to hear artists’ musings on New York City over 100 years. (via NYMag)

landscapelifescape:

Iguazu falls, Argentina
 by lux69aeterna 

It’s an amazing place.

landscapelifescape:

Iguazu falls, Argentina

 by lux69aeterna 

It’s an amazing place.